Commercial Pilots

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About the Job

Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-winged aircraft on nonscheduled air carrier routes, or helicopters. Requires Commercial Pilot certificate. Includes charter pilots with similar certification, and air ambulance and air tour pilots.

It is also Called

  • Aerial Advertiser
  • Aerial Crop Duster
  • Aerial Hurricane Hunter
  • Aerial Sprayer
  • Agricultural Pilot
  • Airplane Patroller
  • Airplane Pilot
  • Astronaut
  • Aviator
  • Balloonist
View All

What They Do

  • Use instrumentation to pilot aircraft when visibility is poor.
  • Start engines, operate controls, and pilot airplanes to transport passengers, mail, or freight according to flight plans, regulations, and procedures.
  • Monitor engine operation, fuel consumption, and functioning of aircraft systems during flights.
  • Check aircraft prior to flights to ensure that the engines, controls, instruments, and other systems are functioning properly.
  • Consider airport altitudes, outside temperatures, plane weights, and wind speeds and directions to calculate the speed needed to become airborne.
  • Contact control towers for takeoff clearances, arrival instructions, and other information, using radio equipment.
  • Obtain and review data such as load weights, fuel supplies, weather conditions, and flight schedules to determine flight plans and identify needed changes.
  • File instrument flight plans with air traffic control so that flights can be coordinated with other air traffic.
  • Check baggage or cargo to ensure that it has been loaded correctly.
  • Order changes in fuel supplies, loads, routes, or schedules to ensure safety of flights.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $84,240 with most people making between $55,210 and $138,360

Outlook

1.96%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 3,260 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 3,900 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 64 openings due to growth and about 76 replacement openings for approximately 140 total annual openings.