Layout Workers, Metal and Plastic

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About the Job

Lay out reference points and dimensions on metal or plastic stock or workpieces, such as sheets, plates, tubes, structural shapes, castings, or machine parts, for further processing. Includes shipfitters.

It is also Called

  • Aircraft Lay Out Worker
  • Bellmaker
  • Coordinate Measuring Machine Technician (CMM Technician)
  • Development Mechanic
  • Dimensional Inspector
  • Duplicator
  • Fabricator
  • Fitter
  • Fitter Up
  • Hangersmith
View All

What They Do

  • Fit and align fabricated parts to be welded or assembled.
  • Plan and develop layouts from blueprints and templates, applying knowledge of trigonometry, design, effects of heat, and properties of metals.
  • Brace parts in position within hulls or ships for riveting or welding.
  • Lay out and fabricate metal structural parts such as plates, bulkheads, and frames.
  • Mark curves, lines, holes, dimensions, and welding symbols onto workpieces, using scribes, soapstones, punches, and hand drills.
  • Compute layout dimensions, and determine and mark reference points on metal stock or workpieces for further processing, such as welding and assembly.
  • Locate center lines and verify template positions, using measuring instruments such as gauge blocks, height gauges, and dial indicators.
  • Plan locations and sequences of cutting, drilling, bending, rolling, punching, and welding operations, using compasses, protractors, dividers, and rules.
  • Lift and position workpieces in relation to surface plates, manually or with hoists, and using parallel blocks and angle plates.
  • Design and prepare templates of wood, paper, or metal.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $41,150 with most people making between $28,500 and $59,300

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 390 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 320 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 10 replacement openings for approximately 10 total annual openings.

Apprenticeship Opportunities

Work Keys

This occupation requires a Silver certificate

Skill Level
Observation5
Locating Information4
Applied Mathematics4
Applied Technology3
Reading for Information3
Teamwork3