Drilling and Boring Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic

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About the Job

Set up, operate, or tend drilling machines to drill, bore, ream, mill, or countersink metal or plastic work pieces.

It is also Called

  • Automatic Driller and Reamer
  • Automatic Drilling Machine Operator
  • Barrel Driller
  • Billet Driller
  • Borematic Machine Operator
  • Borematic Operator
  • Bore Mill Operator
  • Bore Mill Operator for Plastic
  • Borer
  • Boring Machine Operator
View All

What They Do

  • Verify conformance of machined work to specifications, using measuring instruments, such as calipers, micrometers, or fixed or telescoping gauges.
  • Study machining instructions, job orders, or blueprints to determine dimensional or finish specifications, sequences of operations, setups, or tooling requirements.
  • Change worn cutting tools, using wrenches.
  • Select and set cutting speeds, feed rates, depths of cuts, and cutting tools, according to machining instructions or knowledge of metal properties.
  • Install tools in spindles.
  • Move machine controls to lower tools to workpieces and to engage automatic feeds.
  • Establish zero reference points on workpieces, such as at the intersections of two edges or over hole locations.
  • Position and secure workpieces on tables, using bolts, jigs, clamps, shims, or other holding devices.
  • Observe drilling or boring machine operations to detect any problems.
  • Lift workpieces onto work tables either manually or with hoists or direct crane operators to lift and position workpieces.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $39,310 with most people making between $25,080 and $57,940

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 1,560 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 1,220 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 30 replacement openings for approximately 30 total annual openings.

Apprenticeship Opportunities

Work Keys

This occupation requires a Platinum certificate

Skill Level
Locating Information6
Applied Mathematics5
Reading for Information3