Log Graders and Scalers

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About the Job

Grade logs or estimate the marketable content or value of logs or pulpwood in sorting yards, millpond, log deck, or similar locations. Inspect logs for defects or measure logs to determine volume.

It is also Called

  • Check Scaler
  • Compounding Scaler
  • Contract Forester
  • Decker
  • Deckman
  • Deck Scaler
  • Deck Specialist
  • Inspector
  • Landing Scaler
  • Log Buyer
View All

What They Do

  • Evaluate log characteristics and determine grades, using established criteria.
  • Record data about individual trees or load volumes into tally books or hand-held collection terminals.
  • Measure felled logs or loads of pulpwood to calculate volume, weight, dimensions, and marketable value, using measuring devices and conversion tables.
  • Paint identification marks of specified colors on logs to identify grades or species, using spray cans, or call out grades to log markers.
  • Jab logs with metal ends of scale sticks, and inspect logs to ascertain characteristics or defects such as water damage, splits, knots, broken ends, rotten areas, twists, and curves.
  • Identify logs of substandard or special grade so that they can be returned to shippers, regraded, recut, or transferred for other processing.
  • Arrange for hauling of logs to appropriate mill sites.
  • Weigh log trucks before and after unloading, and record load weights and supplier identities.
  • Measure log lengths and mark boles for bucking into logs, according to specifications.
  • Communicate with coworkers by using signals to direct log movement.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Independence, but also value Support and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $34,240 with most people making between $25,770 and $49,220

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2012, this occupation employed approximately 70 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 50 employed in 2022.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 0 replacement openings for approximately 0 total annual openings.

Work Keys

This occupation requires a Bronze certificate

Skill Level
Teamwork4
Observation4
Locating Information3
Reading for Information3
Applied Mathematics3
Writing2