Forest and Conservation Workers

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About the Job

Under supervision, perform manual labor necessary to develop, maintain, or protect areas such as forests, forested areas, woodlands, wetlands, and rangelands through such activities as raising and transporting seedlings; combating insects, pests, and diseases harmful to plant life; and building structures to control water, erosion, and leaching of soil. Includes forester aides, seedling pullers, and tree planters.

It is also Called

  • Blister Rust Eradicator
  • Box Chipper
  • Box Cutter
  • Boxer
  • Box Puller
  • Brusher
  • Chemical Sprayer
  • Chopper
  • Christmas Tree Farm Worker
  • Christmas Tree Grader
View All

What They Do

  • Gather, package, or deliver forest products to buyers.
  • Sow or harvest cover crops, such as alfalfa.
  • Check equipment to ensure that it is operating properly.
  • Spray or inject vegetation with insecticides to kill insects or to protect against disease or with herbicides to reduce competing vegetation.
  • Maintain tallies of trees examined and counted during tree marking or measuring efforts.
  • Confer with other workers to discuss issues such as safety, cutting heights, or work needs.
  • Identify diseased or undesirable trees and remove them, using power saws or hand saws.
  • Drag cut trees from cutting areas and load trees onto trucks.
  • Sort tree seedlings, discarding substandard seedlings, according to standard charts or verbal instructions.
  • Operate skidders, bulldozers, or other prime movers to pull a variety of scarification or site preparation equipment over areas to be regenerated.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Independence and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2014, the average annual wage in Ohio was $35,820 with most people making between $27,170 and $46,010

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 60 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 60 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 0 replacement openings for approximately 0 total annual openings.