Municipal Firefighters

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About the Job

Control and extinguish municipal fires, protect life and property and conduct rescue efforts.

It is also Called

  • Apparatus Operator
  • Fire Alarm Operator
  • Fire Apparatus Engineer
  • Fireboat Operator
  • Fire Captain
  • Fire Chief
  • Fire Chief's Aide
  • Fire Engineer
  • Fire Equipment Operator
  • Firefighter
View All

What They Do

  • Search burning buildings to locate fire victims.
  • Rescue victims from burning buildings, accident sites, and water hazards.
  • Administer first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation to injured persons.
  • Dress with equipment such as fire-resistant clothing and breathing apparatus.
  • Move toward the source of a fire, using knowledge of types of fires, construction design, building materials, and physical layout of properties.
  • Assess fires and situations and report conditions to superiors to receive instructions, using two-way radios.
  • Respond to fire alarms and other calls for assistance, such as automobile and industrial accidents.
  • Create openings in buildings for ventilation or entrance, using axes, chisels, crowbars, electric saws, or core cutters.
  • Drive and operate fire fighting vehicles and equipment.
  • Inspect fire sites after flames have been extinguished to ensure that there is no further danger.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RSE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Social and Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $46,710 with most people making between $22,580 and $74,610

Outlook

0.42%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 17,700 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 18,440 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 74 openings due to growth and about 516 replacement openings for approximately 590 total annual openings.

Work Keys

This occupation requires a Silver certificate

Skill Level
Applied Technology5
Observation5
Reading for Information4
Teamwork4
Locating Information4
Applied Mathematics3
Listening3
Writing3