Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists

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About the Job

Operate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners. Monitor patient safety and comfort, and view images of area being scanned to ensure quality of pictures. May administer gadolinium contrast dosage intravenously. May interview patient, explain MRI procedures, and position patient on examining table. May enter into the computer data such as patient history, anatomical area to be scanned, orientation specified, and position of entry.

It is also Called

  • Chief Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist (Chief MRI Technologist)
  • Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist (CT/MRI Technologist)
  • Imaging Technologist
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging Coordinator (MRI Coordinator)
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging Director
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quality Assurance Coordinator (MRI Quality Assurance Coordinator)
  • Medical Imaging Director
  • MRI Specialist (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Specialist)
  • MRI Special Procedures Technologist (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Special Procedures Technologist)
  • MRI Supervisor (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Supervisor)
View All

What They Do

  • Operate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners.
  • Select appropriate imaging techniques or coils to produce required images.
  • Inject intravenously contrast dyes, such as gadolinium contrast, in accordance with scope of practice.
  • Position patients on cradle, attaching immobilization devices if needed, to ensure appropriate placement for imaging.
  • Conduct screening interviews of patients to identify contraindications, such as ferrous objects, pregnancy, prosthetic heart valves, cardiac pacemakers, or tattoos.
  • Provide headphones or earplugs to patients to improve comfort and reduce unpleasant noise.
  • Explain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures to patients, patient representatives, or family members.
  • Take brief medical histories from patients.
  • Inspect images for quality, using magnetic resonance scanner equipment and laser camera.
  • Place and secure small, portable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners on body part to be imaged, such as arm, leg, or head.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCS.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Social environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Working Conditions and Support in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Ohio was $64,170 with most people making between $50,440 and $79,980

Outlook

1.32%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 1,520 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 1,720 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 20 openings due to growth and about 30 replacement openings for approximately 50 total annual openings.