Nanosystems Engineers

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About the Job

Design, develop, or supervise the production of materials, devices, or systems of unique molecular or macromolecular composition, applying principles of nanoscale physics and electrical, chemical, or biological engineering.

It is also Called

  • Advanced Research Programs Director
  • Durability Engineer
  • Microarray Operations Vice President
  • Nanoelectronics Engineer
  • Nanosystems Engineer
  • Research Scientist
  • Scientist
  • Technical Programs Manager

What They Do

  • Write proposals to secure external funding or to partner with other companies.
  • Synthesize, process, or characterize nanomaterials, using advanced tools or techniques.
  • Supervise technologists or technicians engaged in nanotechnology research or production.
  • Prepare reports, deliver presentations, or participate in program review activities to communicate engineering results or recommendations.
  • Provide scientific or technical guidance or expertise to scientists, engineers, technologists, technicians, or others, using knowledge of chemical, analytical, or biological processes as applied to micro and nanoscale systems.
  • Conduct research related to a range of nanotechnology topics, such as packaging, heat transfer, fluorescence detection, nanoparticle dispersion, hybrid systems, liquid systems, nanocomposites, nanofabrication, optoelectronics, or nanolithography.
  • Identify new applications for existing nanotechnologies.
  • Design or conduct tests of new nanotechnology products, processes, or systems.
  • Develop processes or identify equipment needed for pilot or commercial nanoscale scale production.
  • Generate high-resolution images or measure force-distance curves, using techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IRE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic and Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Working Conditions and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

Wages

In 2018, the average annual wage in Ohio was $93,370 with most people making between $45,580 and $147,280

Outlook

0.61%
avg. annual growth

During 2016, this occupation employed approximately 7,380 people in Ohio. It is projected that there will be 7,830 employed in 2026.

This occupation will have about 45 openings due to growth and about 485 replacement openings for approximately 530 total annual openings.